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Thread: The Work Thread

  1. #371
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    I'm just picking on you, and hating your company. But I should be nice so as long as you work there I keep getting the friend discount!

  2. #372
    Tiny Dancer Drewbie's Avatar
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    Second interview next Friday at a start-up-ish software company where I am friends with several people there, one of which is the CTO. First phone chat went very well and now I have a video call next week. I mentioned that I'm only a 15 minute drive away and would be happy to come up, but that struck them as odd given we can just turn on the video chat.

    I am old.

  3. #373
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    I've been hating my job for about 8 months now. I've been casually looking around, but my job search kicked up a notch when I found out the CEO was thinking of moving my group to Denver or Raleigh NC.

    So yesterday I get back from a week's vacation and find out that the plan is definitely to move my job and "I can apply for the job in Raleigh". Yeah, right.

    As if that weren't enough, I got my annual review in my email (yes, in my email) and it was a crappy review (2 out of 5 stars). No specifics on my performance, or lack thereof, given. No warning that I was headed for that kind of review. I suspect my direct manager, who's been around for all of 2 months, was told to give me that rating by my director who has not a single clue about what I do day to day. My direct manager had a 30 minute meeting with me to discuss it. He said that his experiences with me have all been good, but he pled ignorance since he's only been around 2 months.

    I felt like crap for a few hours until I talked with my coworker. My coworker is a rock star. He's one of those engineers who can solve any problem you throw at him. He was instrumental in so many improvements to our development processes and infrastructure. They gave him a crappy 2/5 review as well. They don't have to worry about his job moving to Raleigh, though, because he's from Canada and HR neglected to file his green card papers, so his visa expires in 6 weeks.

    I'm in that place where I fantasize about giving my two weeks notice, and suddenly becoming immune to all the BS. I'm actively interviewing. I'm hopeful that a phone screen I just went through will result in something.

    The saddest thing about this is that I used to absolutely love this job. The work was fun and interesting, my coworkers were great, and my management appreciated me. On top of that I had a walking commute!! Now it's a hellscape of a place. If healthcare weren't tied to my job I'd be tempted to just quit now and hope I could find something quickly.

    It's amazing how quickly something really good can go to crap when the wrong people take charge.
    - Definitely

  4. #374
    Darth Small Macheath's Avatar
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    Wow, that's a real pile. Sorry to hear it.

    I feel like this is only peripherally on topic, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by RainMan View Post
    If healthcare weren't tied to my job
    Hate this. Best reason to hope for universal healthcare (aside from fewer dead children, etc.) is that we'll no longer have this Sword of Damocles shit hanging over us when we want to leave a job.

  5. #375
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    Quote Originally Posted by Macheath View Post


    I feel like this is only peripherally on topic, but...

    Hate this. Best reason to hope for universal healthcare (aside from fewer dead children, etc.) is that we'll no longer have this Sword of Damocles shit hanging over us when we want to leave a job.
    Preach!
    - Definitely

  6. #376
    Tiny Dancer Drewbie's Avatar
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    Had one of my employees come in with a technical question today. The subject matter was irrelevant given what you guys know about what I do nothing, but anyway, he was asking if he could use a less that ideal product in place of the typical solution. I thought my response was rather clever.

    "You can do anything if you don't mind failing."

  7. #377
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    "Failure is how we learn!"



    "... also, I've already learned that lesson and I can tell you it's wrong, don't do that you idiot."

  8. #378
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    Had an in-person interview with what I think is a pretty good company today.

    Man, I choked on the part I should have been strong in, PHP programming, and I did way better on other things I consider myself weak at such as system architecture.

    I hate coding interviews.

    I'll say this, though, they didn't ask me some stupid question requiring me to know some algorithm I learned in school and never used once in the real world.

    I've got a phone screen on Friday that'll be like that. Why do companies ask these kinds of questions? They tell you nothing about what kind of engineer the candidate is.
    - Definitely

  9. #379
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    I had an interview last year where they asked me how to implement bubble sort. I really wasn't sure how to do it off the top of my head, but with a few prompts from them I was able to complete it. I feel like being able to figure it out on the fly said more about me as a dev than memorizing the solution ahead of time would have. They didn't seem to agree because I didn't get a call back from them.

  10. #380
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    Bubble sort? The dumbest sort there is. Yep, knowing that one off the top of your head really helps you in your day to day job.

    I think this algorithm fad grew out of a need for engineers to feel smarter than the candidate they're interviewing. That stuff tells you nothing about who you're hiring.

    When I interview people I ask them enough technical questions to confirm they're not lying on their resume. After that I just want to see a good mind at work. The reality is that whoever you hire isn't going to know anything you need him to know for a couple of months. You want to hire someone who will be able to learn, and who you can stand to work with.

    Frankly, the kind of engineer who can code Dykstra's algorithm off the top of his head, and can quote the complexity of each tree traversal algorithm is probably a prima donna and won't be much fun to deal with over the long haul.

    I found this article interesting.
    - Definitely

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